Mar 2, 2012

Thank you to those who rescue puppies...

 BMW's at Trooper Tony's Life Celebration
Forgive me while I rant about something totally motorcycle unrelated but worthy of a rant.

My Father tells me a story about my Great Great Grandfather who was a sheriff in 1936.  Reportedly, Great Great Gramps was gunned down and killed inside the very market where as a high schooler I used to buy my candy bars in Lowell, OR.  Great (x2) Gramp's gun and badge are tucked inside my Father's safe.  Dad pulls them out for viewings now and then, proud to have a piece of our family history and still harboring questions about that fateful day in 1936.  I guess there are some questions that never get answered.

If you are from the Pacific Northwest you have probably heard about the recent murder of Washington State's  "Trooper Tony" while he was on patrol.  It is just one more law enforcement tragedy that we must all learn to live with.  In Pendelton, OR the town is most assuredly still questioning Correctional Officer Herron's senseless killing.  In Eugene, OR, Officer Kilcullen's one year anniversary is quickly approaching, and in the small town of Rainier, OR, residents still drive past the place where Chief Painter's life was taken.  In Pierce County, WA, Deputy Sheriff Wright is remembered as well. All of these officers, husbands, fathers and friends were murdered while doing their jobs and trying to keep us all safe.

A sea of Blue: LEO's send off Trooper Tony  
There are times when life seems to hold more tragedy than happiness, more sadness than bliss.  The death of yet another police officer, murdered in the line of duty, is a perfect example of one of those times.  According to the Officer Down Memorial Page (http://www.odmp.org/) the year 2012, being only two months over, has been witness to 20 line of duty deaths.  These twenty tragedies across the United States have affected police, parks and correctional departments, public safety and sheriff's offices and been the cause of countless tears, questions, and sorrow.  They have widowed many,  left children parentless, and yet also have given communities the opportunity to come together and show their support and love, often from people who have never or will never meet the families of those left behind.  I am thankful for everyone who takes a moment to stop and remember those who have been killed in the line of duty, who offers a helping hand to those friends and family members left behind,  and for every officer who continues to patrol the streets, to investigate the crimes, and to rescue innocent puppies.

In order for these men and women law enforcement officers to continue to make a difference they need our support.  They need citizens to speak up and do their part.  To make the call when they witness wrong being done or when the crazy neighbor gets worse.  We all need to stop looking away and start looking at making a difference. Show up.  Be counted.  Give when you can and what you can.   Above all else, appreciate those in blue, brown, green and tan, who wake every morning knowing the job they have to do may take them away from their families; yet they do it anyway.

May they never be forgotten.

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